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  • Planned Giving at Haven Hills

    The Planned Giving Insights within this blog are provided through the generosity of our board member, Valerie J. Bowman, CPWA®.   Ms. Bowman is not compensated for these writings and, like all of our board, is not compensated for her service on the board. Valerie Bowman is a Certified Private Wealth Advisor® professional and President and CEO of Bowman Wealth Management, LLC.

    Hello Valerie – thank you for taking the time to share your insights on planned giving. Can you tell us a little about what planned giving is?

    Planned giving is an area of fundraising that refers to several specific gift types that can be funded with cash, equity, or **property. In brief, a planned giving request is a solicitation of major gifts for Haven Hills, often contributed by an individual donor through a will, bequest, or trust. As a planned giving donor, one recognizes that causes that they care about will continue to exist, even after their passing. Donors are giving because they want to.  Haven Hills is asking because we need to help others.  We appreciate that donors are both kind enough to give now and curious about how they can give later.

    **Note: Donors should refer to the Haven Hills gift acceptance police for details of the specific types of gifts this organization is prepared to receive. Contact the Development Department at 818-887-7481 ext. 121

    In addition to sending the, much appreciated, cash donations directly to Haven Hills, what are some other ways for donors to give now?

    Donor can establish a donor advised fund (DAF).  A donor advised fund is an irrevocable charitable giving account that can be established at a sponsoring organization like the charitable arm of a financial services firm or a community foundation.  Once the donor deposits assets into the account, they receive an immediate tax deduction based on their AGI, adjusted gross income. In most cases, the donor can direct the fund administrator to grant funds from the DAF to a specific nonprofit organization like Haven Hills.

    What are some of the planned giving option for donors?

    Let me mention some general categories.  The specifics of each category should be discussed with one’s financial professionals.

    One of the simplest ways to make a gift is through a will or trust

    • Simply name Haven Hills as a beneficiary in a will or trust.

    Donors can also designate Haven Hills as the beneficiary of the following types of assets:

    • Retirement plans, financial account, or annuities

    I’ve heard that Life Insurance can be donated as well. Is this correct?

    Yes, often life insurance is no longer needed to cover the expenses for which it was originally purchased.  Donors can either gift a policy to Haven Hills by naming Haven Hills as the owner and/ or designate Haven Hills as the beneficiary of the life insurance policy. The tax benefits for this type of donation are dependent on many factors and proper council should be sought.

    Suppose a donor wants to give a gift of Real Estate

    As part of the mission of Haven Hills is to provide shelter to victims of domestic violence, receiving real estate would certainly further that cause. However, we continue to invite donors to review the gift acceptance policy or contact Haven Hills to discuss the details of the property.   Different tax deductions are available dependent, among other things, on how the property is used by Haven Hills or if it is sold and proceeds are use to support the mission of Haven Hills. There are many details about the donation of real estate that will impact the donor’s tax deduction. This can be a great option for the donor as it may lead to potential avoidance of capital gains tax if donated to Haven Hills rather than selling the property prior to donating it. t A charitable trust which can also be utilized to sell the property. I can’t emphasize enough, the importance of speaking to tax, and legal counsel to ensure that generous gifts of real estate provide the charitable impact the donor wants, the financial impact they are entitled to, and the freedom of Haven Hills to use the property without incurring any financial responsibilities.

    What About Gift of One’s Home?

    A donor and their attorney can establish what is called a gift of a remainder interest in a personal residence.  Basically, if you own your home you may irrevocably transfer title to Haven Hills, while retaining the right to use it during your lifetime, and continuing to pay the home’s expenses. After which time, Haven Hills will take ownership. The IRS has specific guidelines for the calculation of the tax deduction, and discourages debt-encumbered property, which may cause unwanted consequences for both the donor and Haven Hills.

    Is appreciated stock something a donor could gift?

    Yes, Amber.  I mentioned charitable trust earlier, which, in brief, is a legal document that crates a means to transfer assets to a charity and may be established as a charity itself. There are many different types of charitable trust, which we will discuss, in our next blog. Each has different tax advantages and serves a different purpose. But, to answer your question, yes, donors can donate appreciated securities and to Haven Hills outright or through a trust. Again donors should refer to the gift acceptance policy for addition information and specific instructions on transfers through a brokerage account.

    In conclusion, these potential legacy gifts will be a lasting tribute to the donor, create fond memories for their family about their generosity, and, of course, evoke eternal gratitude from Haven Hills and the victims of domestic violence.

    *Income tax deduction for your planned gifts are dependent on may factors including your AGI, adjusted gross income. Please consult your tax professional to determine the tax deduction and savings for your much-appreciated generosity in gifting one or more of the above-mentioned gifts.

    *Including language in your will about your desire to give is a simple process.

    The hardest part of this delayed giving is perhaps gathering all family members and sharing your desire to leave a legacy to a charitable organization, upon your passing.

    Providing for the future of a charity does not have to be to the exclusion of your heirs. If you so choose, there are many ways to provide for both, the details of which will be discussed in the next blog. Regardless of how you choose to give, Haven Hills is available to help you decide which giving vehicle best suits your needs and the needs of your family.

    “I can testify that it is nearly always easier to make $1,000,000 honestly than to dispose of wisely” -Julius Rosenwald-

    Ms. Bowman is a resident of California by way of Chicago, a city that certainly has its share of homelessness. However, upon moving to California she was stunned by an even heightened level of homelessness that appears to be California’s new normal. According to Los Angeles City Women’s Needs Assessment, (2019) 36% of homeless women were victims of domestic violence.  Ms. Bowman has both written and spoken about homelessness. She is proud to be part of an organization that provides safety, shelter, and support to victims of domestic violence and proud to serve on the Haven Hills Board.

     The information provided is meant to be general, and educational in nature. For specifics of your situation, please consult with your tax, legal, or financial professional, to determine the impact on your estate, gift and income taxes.

  • 40 Hour Domestic Violence Training

    Everyone deserves to have a violence free relationship. Any relationship. The term domestic violence describes physical, sexual, emotional, psychological, financial, digital, and / or religious abuse by a current or former partner or spouse. This violence can occur in any relationship. Heterosexual couples, same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy. Domestic violence affects women and men and their children.

    I am not a counselor nor do I have a license to provide counseling or therapy but I recently took Haven Hills’ 40-Hour Domestic Violence training and walked away with the tools on how to support someone who is asking for help. What I did learn is that anyone can help.

    Violence is a learned and taught behavior. Children who witness domestic violence in the home are at more risk of experiencing domestic violence as they grow up – as teens and adults. Family is our central institution and the primary source of how we learn as children. Unhealthy relationship behaviors are likely to be repeated by children if this is what is modeled in the home, especially if this aggressive behavior is shown to be an effective method for handling conflict, “I saw my parents do it” kind of attitude.

    Domestic violence is a silent epidemic. It occurs anywhere and across all populations and DV can also take many forms. 90% of people in the U.S. fail to define repeated emotional, verbal, sexual abuse and controlling behaviors as patterns of domestic abuse.

    About 1 in 5 women and about 1 in 9 men report having experienced severe physical violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime.

    Upon further research I found that California sees higher rates than the national average with 32% of women and 27% of men report experiencing domestic violence by an intimate partner.

    I learned that many people do not speak up. I learned that many people go back because they do not have the tools or help to survive on their own. 40-Hours may seem like a long time but the team at Haven Hills has broken it down into weekly online presentations with a corresponding module. The staff was available and open to as many questions that me and my peers had during the lessons. The commitment you are making to learn more about how you can be an advocate to help supersedes the time it takes to complete the certificate. You are surrounded by other ambassadors who are taking the steps to stop harassment or violence to make a significant difference in someone’s life, and send a powerful message.

    I will continue to bring awareness to this cause, educate our community and play an active role in helping to establish an environment where healthy and positive relationships are based on respect, safety and equality. I learned that Haven Hills has the tools to help.

    24/7 Crisis Line 818-887-6589

    They are just a phone call away.

  • Teaching Through a Pandemic

    One pandemic later and we are living in a world of virtual learning and 18 months later we are slowly beginning to integrate back to some semblance of normalcy. We wanted to take a moment to interview Haven Hills’ teacher to share her thoughts about the education program at Haven Hills and how the pandemic has affected her program. 

    • Interviewer: Tell me about Haven Hills’ Children’s programs and on-site shelter school? 

    I am extremely proud of the educational program my team and I have developed throughout my 10 years at Haven Hills. We have always maintained a child-centered curriculum, combined with rigorous attention to state standards; taught in a creative and engaging way. As a teacher who has previously taught in classrooms containing 30+ students, I feel blessed to have the luxury of an environment where I can focus on individual needs and strengths so vital to a child’s growth and self-esteem. Both the kids and I have thrived in this atmosphere. When I hear a 15-year-old boy tell me that mine was the first class where he ever read an entire book, or when a 10-year-old girl, told for years she was “stupid” at math, lights up at mastering division; it is no mystery why I have stayed here 10 years.  

    We focus on English/Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies every day.  Art, music, and dance are also a big part of my classroom.  Over the years, I have collected a terrific assortment of lesson plans for all grades and interests.  Some, I have written, some I have borrowed, and on some I have collaborated.  The remarkable thing about educators is that they love to share their successful lessons with each other! The structure of the classroom is divided by age and grade.  We serve kids kindergarten through high school.  I design an instructional program for each of the kids based on my initial assessments, state standards, and the children’s own strengths and interests.  I only have them for a maximum of 45 days (about 1 and a half months), but it is wonderful to see what some TLC can do. 

    • Interviewer: How is their learning structured during the pandemic? 

     Throughout the last year, the Haven Hills team and I have challenged ourselves to maintain the education of our client’s children in any way possible. We have distributed thrice weekly lessons, worksheets, and curricula, offered Zoom classes, and purchased hands on science and art kits for the kids to enjoy. I have heard from many parents throughout the year that the children enjoy the educational packets and that the parents also enjoy doing them with their kids! So, as an unexpected bonus, parents and children have strengthened their bond! Yay! That said, though, I cannot WAIT to get back into the classroom, whenever that may be. I miss the interaction and the joy I get from my students. 

    • Interviewer: Do you work with partner organizations? 

    Most other DV (DOMESTIC VIOLENCE) shelters do not have onsite schools, which is a shame, because it is unsafe for the children to return to their old school (because of the abuser).  There have been many cases of the abusive partner kidnapping the children from their school and/or using them as leverage against the DV survivor.  So, back in the 70’s, when Haven Hills began, the women who founded it wisely wanted the children to continue their studies. They also knew the routine of school would provide comfort and structure to traumatized kids.  They also intuitively knew that happy kids help heal the DV survivors.  So, they designed a one-room schoolhouse for the survivor’s children onsite where the kids could thrive and get a lot of individual attention they have been needing for years.  Other DV shelters are beginning to catch on to how necessary a school is for the health of their clients and have installed them or in the process of developing them. Another serendipitous event occurred during this last challenging year. A sister shelter contacted me to pick my brain on developing their own classroom onsite! I happily babbled on for an hour to their administrator and it truly reminded me how much I love teaching at Haven Hills. He told me he is going to incorporate many of my suggestions. This success is a shared one:  I could not do the positive things for the kids I do without the support and encouragement of the Haven Hills team. 

    • Interviewer: Do you have any advice for parents out there who may be struggling with school? 

    Advice for parents struggling with school is first…realize we are all struggling so do not be tough on yourself.  Also, do not be ashamed or embarrassed to reach out for support from other parents or teachers, online or by phone.  There are terrific free resources available:  the Los Angeles Unified School District, the PTA, even the public library! There are parent support groups that are open and encouraging to all — all you need to do is ask. 

    • Interviewer: Do you have a favorite teaching moment? 

    My favorite teaching moment is when school is over and the kids do not want to leave! Yes, that does sometimes happen.  That is truly a great moment. 

  • Culturally Specific Support

    Every day, Haven Hills staff sees the devastating impact of Domestic Violence on the faces of the families that come to us for help; they are suffering both emotionally and physically. To offer the help that these families require, we often must consider the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of the clients we are serving. A lack of understanding of a culturally different client’s values and motivations, or the assumption that they are the same as one’s own, can be a significant barrier. A ‘one size fits all’ approach to supporting trauma is not effective.

    For example, many of our clients were brought up to neither share confidences nor admit emotional pain to outsiders. The personal disclosure and behavioral changes that counselors typically suggest can often be embarrassing and totally unimaginable to clients who would rather “handle their own business” than seek outside help from a stranger.

    “Understanding the complexities of a person’s background and individual situation makes a huge difference in successfully assisting them in treating their trauma and achieve self-esteem,” explained Iliana Tavera, Haven Hills Executive Director. “We understand that beliefs and traditions are powerful forces in a person’s life and that providing culturally sensitive care is essential to supporting domestic violence survivors from diverse cultural backgrounds”.

    Clients like Cheri, a woman in her 30s who immigrated to the U.S. in 2003 from Bangladesh in 2003 as part of an arranged marriage agreement. Initially confronted with her husband’s verbal abuse, the situation escalated after a year to slapping, pulling hair, kicking and choking her when he was displeased. The verbal abuse intensified as he criticized her to the children, called her a prostitute and threatened to cut her throat.
    Cheri tried to leave many times, but she was financially dependent on her spouse and did not have friends or family in this country. After years of abuse, Cheri finally called the police after a particularly violent episode, and her husband was arrested in 2015. After his release, he left the country and returned to his home country.

    That year, Cheri began the difficult journey toward independence with the help of social services and the support of the Haven Hills Outreach Program. Learning to do everything on her own was very hard, but with the aid of Haven Hills’ highly trained counselors she has grown in confidence and has become self-sufficient. Ultimately, Cheri was accepted into a nursing program and graduated in 2017.

    Cultural and geographic isolation worsened by financial dependence on a spouse, can be devastating obstacles to overcome. Take for instance Amalia a middle-aged Muslim woman whose marriage to a man 25 years her senior was arranged by her parents when she was only 18.

    Her husband had always been emotionally distant and controlling of the finances, but in recent years he became increasingly abusive. He prevented her from working or getting a college education, and he kept her on a weekly allowance of $25.00, requiring her to account for every penny. His criticism and blame extended to belittling her to their grown sons and claiming she was crazy. On numerous occasions, he tried to force her to take unknown pills, despite being told by a psychiatrist, following an examination, that she did not need medication.

    Amalia found Haven Hills through an internet search in January 2016. At that time, she was wondering what she could do to make her husband change. Since coming to Haven Hills and attending support groups led by counselors specially trained in domestic violence, her self-esteem has improved. Amalia realized she only has the power to change herself, and she has started to work towards self-sufficiency and divorce.

    She recently completed a class to become a real estate agent. In addition, Haven Hills advocated for her to be a part of Pepperdine’s Microenterprise Program to develop the skills to become an entrepreneur. Amalia was recently accepted into the Pepperdine program and hopes to use the skills she learns there to develop a website and become financially independent.

  • Men and domestic Violence

    Joey’s Survivor Story

    Men don’t suffer from domestic violence, right? Wrong. In the United States alone, one in four men experiences domestic violence. Often, men struggle to get help for domestic violence out of fear of not being believed. They also fear being perceived as less masculine. When men access services, they tend to minimize the abuse and try to avoid the social stigma that comes with their inability to protect themselves. Let’s break down male domestic violence with a few figures.

    • According to the CDC, every 37.8 seconds, a man is the victim of intimate partner violence somewhere in the U.S.
    • Nearly 56% of men who were victims of sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner first experienced these or other forms of violence before age 25.
    • 63% of males, as opposed to 15% of females, had a deadly weapon used against them in a domestic violence incident.
    • Only 15% of the domestic violence reported to law enforcement officials is against men.

    In other words, domestic violence among male survivors is a huge problem that often goes unreported. Although most shelters aid male survivors, most have only limited units that can accommodate them. Therefore, many male survivors of domestic violence do not receive the support they need. That’s not the case with Haven Hills, though. 

    We can accommodate survivors, regardless of their gender, since most of our units are single units. More and more male survivors are coming forward to seek help and, luckily, organizations like Haven Hills are available to help them rebuild their lives with shelter and supportive services. Joey, for example, entered our crisis shelter program a few years back.

    At first, Joey resisted seeking help because his abuser would tell him that no one would believe him and that they would say Joey was the aggressor because he was male. He also viewed his sexual orientation as a barrier that prevented him from seeking the domestic violence support services he needed.

    Once he entered our crisis program, Joey attended a support group and learned how to identify signs of an abusive relationship correctly. He also started individual counseling and discovered not to be ashamed of being a male domestic violence survivor. His son also benefited by receiving tutoring services through our children’s program. 

    When I called Joey to confirm his acceptance into our transitional program, he cried. This 18-month program provides Joey with no-cost temporary housing as he continues to stabilize his life and plan for the future, providing him with tools to establish credit, develop a budget, find a permanent place to live, and develop a safety plan.

    Joey regularly calls to express how thankful he is for all the supportive services we’ve provided him. For years, he stayed in an abusive relationship because he thought there was no help for him and his son. Unfortunately, that may also be the case for an unknown number of male survivors who experience domestic violence but are too afraid or ashamed to seek help. 

    Joey’s story is a powerful reminder of the importance of keeping our services available to all survivors of domestic violence. No one deserves to suffer domestic violence, and Haven Hills is here to help people of every gender break the cycle of abuse.

    Marissa Lemus is the Residential Program Manager for Haven Hills. In this role, she provides services and manages the crisis shelter, transitional shelter, crisis line programs, facility, and staff. Marissa’s professional and educational background is in clinical neuropsychology, which allows her to support both staff and clients holistically. She and her team meet weekly for client case consultations that enable survivors to receive trauma-informed care. Marissa’s main objective is to develop programs that instill self-sufficiency, resiliency, and community within residential clients.

  • Children and Domestic Violence

    Iliana’s Survivor Story

    My earliest childhood memory — I must have been three or four years old — is of my parents fighting. I’m sitting on the couch in the dark, and I hear them arguing in the next room. Arguing is putting it lightly, though, as I can still hear my mother being hit and screaming in pain. I was scared, confused, and crying. Every time someone asks me why I choose to be the executive director of a domestic violence organization, I go back to that memory. 

    Of course, it’s not a memory that I always share with others. It took me two years in this position before I could even utter the words “because my mother is a survivor.” It still feels raw to say it, acknowledging the trauma that my brothers and I experienced in the place where we should have been the safest. But, I say it because I choose not to keep secrets like that anymore. 

    Growing up, I never told anyone. I learned to pretend that everything was okay, which was not a difficult thing to do, given that my father isolated us from family and neighbors. He also kept our friends at arm’s length and never allowed us to have play dates or sleepovers. To this day, it’s hard to let people into my inner sanctum. It can be terrifying to think about inviting others into my home. 

    Now, looking back at my childhood, I’m surprised no one ever guessed. I exhibited the textbook symptoms of a child who has witnessed domestic violence. I had debilitating headaches to the point that my pediatrician feared that I had a brain tumor and ordered an MRI. Moreover, I was always anxious, depressed, quick to anger, and on guard. So, I kept to myself and had trouble making friends. My brothers also exhibited physical symptoms, including severe nosebleeds and stomach aches. Thankfully, though, we skirted many of the other adverse effects domestic violence often has on children:

    • Higher probability of suffering from child abuse
    • Engaging in risky behavior, such as unprotected sex and using alcohol and drugs
    • Bad grades and trouble learning
    • Starting fights, bullying others, or being bullied at school
    • Skipping school or getting into trouble with the law
    • Becoming a victim of domestic violence or abusing an intimate partner

    I decided to take this job because, as a childhood survivor of domestic violence, I saw Haven Hills as an opportunity to help other child survivors overcome the effects of their trauma. I wanted to make sure that this organization had the financial and staffing resources to provide others with what I lacked as a child. 

    We invest a great deal into the children that come to our shelters and attend our programs to ensure that we stop the intergenerational cycle of abuse before it’s replicated in the next generation. That’s because we believe the most important thing that we can provide a young person to counteract the devastating effects of domestic violence is a safe, caring environment with staff available to help them work through their trauma. 

    Although children may never forget the trauma they experienced, they can learn what it means to have healthy relationships and positively manage their emotions. And the sooner we offer that intervention, the easier it becomes for them to develop into healthy adults. I know that the other staff and I at Haven Hills take that responsibility very seriously. 

    My story and that of my brothers’ has a happy ending. We’re mostly well-adjusted individuals with caring partners and have built homes that are free of the trauma we experienced as children. We were lucky to find our way. My hope now is that Haven Hills staff can help others find their way, too.

    Iliana Tavera was named Executive Director of Haven Hills, Inc. in 2015. At Haven Hills, Iliana is responsible for managing one of the largest domestic violence providers in Los Angeles County. She has 25 years of experience in nonprofit management, fundraising, operations, and a strong track record of developing successful collaborations among the private sector, nonprofits, and community partners.

    Please visit this webpage from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services for more information on the effects of domestic violence on children. 

  • Housing First Program: How Haven Hills Helps Survivors of Domestic Violence Find Housing

    For 43 years, Haven Hills has been adapting to provide domestic violence survivors with services to support their emerging needs. From our humble beginning as a hotline that operated from 9 am – 4 pm, when the Savings and Loan bank that donated space was open, to the opening of our shelters and our Service Center. 

    We pride ourselves in providing innovative services to help survivors overcome their trauma and build better lives for themselves and their children. That’s one of the reasons why we’ve been integrating more into housing issues over the past five years. Reports state that safe, affordable housing is often one of the primary barriers survivors face when leaving their abusive partner. Those reports also document domestic violence as the leading cause of homelessness for women and children.

    In 2020, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) reported that 18,858 women, men, and children across the county have experienced or are homeless due to domestic violence, a 40% increase from 2019. Sadly, DV victims make up 41% of the total “unsheltered” homeless population or those living on the streets, in their cars, and other places not suited to human habitation. Although these are alarming figures, many professionals argue that these statistics are low and do not accurately capture the number of domestic violence survivors living on the streets. 

    We have seen survivors leave our transitional shelter for years now and struggle to find affordable housing. Upon leaving, many survivors often face two terrible choices: return to their abusers or become homeless. Societally, we urge survivors to leave their abusers, even going so far as to tell them they must leave. Yet, where should they go? 

    That’s why Haven Hills founded its Housing First Program in 2018. This program, funded through the California Office of Emergency Services, helps families find safe and affordable housing to ensure their safety. The program provides survivors with housing assistance for rent, utilities, furniture, and essential supplies. It also includes case management through our Housing Navigator. This staff member helps survivors locate and secure housing, ensuring they receive the supportive services needed to stay housed. 

    The Housing First Program has helped survivors exiting from our transitional program, crisis shelter, and outreach programs to find housing successfully. Before implementing this program, roughly 40–50% of clients leaving our transitional program obtained housing. In 2018, that percentage grew to 80%, and in 2019 100% of exiting survivors moved on to permanent housing. Without financial support, this upward trend would be very different. 

    The COVID-19 pandemic has been especially challenging for this program. Dozens of survivors have turned to us to help them stay in their homes as they faced reduced hours at work or loss of employment. Housing First funding has helped prevent homelessness for survivors with no other options. When DV survivors must choose between living in violence at home or subjecting themselves and their children to violence on the street, we must do all we can to make sure that these are not their only options. 

    Maria Barahona has been with Haven Hills since 2014. Over that time, she served as its Director of Development and currently serves as the Director of Compliance. In this capacity, she oversees our public contracts and new program development, including Haven Hill’s Housing First and DART Shelter Advocate Programs.  
    Please visit the National Alliance for Safe Housing and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) for more information on homelessness and domestic violence.

  • Learn About
    Domestic Violence

    What is domestic violence? The definition of domestic violence is as follows: domestic violence is a pattern of behaviors in any relationship that one intimate partner uses to get or keep power and control over another intimate partner.

    In other words, domestic violence is physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions that influence another person. In an abusive relationship, one intimate partner uses physical, sexual, emotional, or other types of domestic violence to try to gain and maintain power and control over the other partner.

    Every human being has the right to feel safe, to live each day, and rest each night, free from violent actions and intimidating threats.

    Every human heart can admit what love is — and is not. Love is not abuse. Domestic violence is never acceptable in any relationship.

    DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CAN HAPPEN TO ANYONE

    Married couples. People who are living together or who are dating. Teens. College students. Newlyweds. So-called “Power Couples” blessed with wealth and fame. Men and women working to raise themselves out of poverty. LGBTQ partners. People with disabilities. Seniors. Anyone.

    DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AFFECTS EVERYONE

    We all need to understand domestic violence. Learn how to recognize the signs of domestic violence happening in your own life or the lives of friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers, or anyone you know.